Eco Bee Box Created the Utah Hive – 2013

This video shows the new box being used for Queen Rearing, but comb honey is maybe another great possibility. This box was initially created to produce comb honey and is intended to be a low effort for the beekeeper. Here is the reasoning: To prepare the honey for bottles, you need to rent or buy an extractor, uncapping tool, buckets, strainers, filters, and bottles.  In the end, the consumer doesn’t know if you modified the honey and essentially you get little for your messy, high effort – honey. Comb honey is in demand by the consumer and essentially is untouched […]

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Build Your Own Observation Hive – 2014

An observation hive is one of the most interesting and rewarding types of beehives.  Up until now, observation hives were limited to a single frame or a number of single frames exposed through a large front window. Eco Bee Box had a goal of making an observation hive out of standard beekeeping equipment, the reason being the beekeeper knows how to use this box and had frames all ready to fit.  The beekeeper could build up the colony to survive the winter, whereas most single frame observation hives die due to lack of resources and difficult clustering space during winter. […]

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Sustainable Beekeeping – Queens, Honeycomb, and Pollination – 2015

Two conflicting problems are seen in beekeeping: 80% of beekeepers lose their bees the first year. Beekeepers are told not to expect honey the first year. This poses an incredible challenge. Honey won’t magically appear if there are no bees or forage for them to produce it. The next problem beekeepers face is: most beekeepers do not know how to raise a queen. If the queen fails, dies, leaves, or any number of additional reasons, the beekeeper is left to try to find another queen, or wait until next year to get back into beekeeping. Eco Bee Box promotes a […]

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Missing Link for Beekeepers – The Mini Urban Beehive – 2014

How many beekeepers were a part of the USDA study the last few years where they randomly testing hives all across the country for chemicals and diseases? This year the study concluded that chemicals found in the hives at toxic levels were added by the beekeeper!  Sad revelation really. In testing beekeepers a few questions can be asked: 1)  How much honey do you harvest yearly? 2)  Do you know how to raise your own queens? 3)  Do you medicate your colonies? The answer to these questions says a lot about the beekeeper.  Most beekeepers even beginners have a focus […]

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Evolution of the Mini Urban Beehive – 2015

In 2013 David Bench and Albert Chubak were working in the bee yard and had decided to replace a number of queens.  They purchased replacements and had them ready to be placed in about 20 hives.  At that time Eco Bee Box had just developed a true 1/2 shallow nuc box (8 1/8″ x 20″ x 5 5/8″) with an inset window.  The last failing queen was saved and placed into this special nuc box, which held 13 mini frames instead of 4-5 long frames.  Two frames were set with drawn empty comb with elastic bands.  They took one deep […]

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Use Eco Bee Box for Swarms and Transportation – 2012

How easy is the Eco Bee Box to transport? These boxes were designed by a beekeeper for beekeepers by a general contractor who wanted boxes fast, strong and required little to no upkeep.  One of the features/equipment added to the bee box was a locking clip.  The locking clip can be used to hold the bottom board to the lower brood box, can hold brood boxes together (propolis will hold but does break), and can hold honey supers to the inner cover or a flush mount top cover. When capturing swarms this locking clip serves a wonderful purpose of holding […]

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Utah Hive Box for Comb Honey – 2013

The Utah Hive Box is quite unique.  It is a true half Langstroth box, 8 1/8″ across and allows for frames to sit side-by-side or end-to-end.  This style of box can be either a medium or deep Langstroth box.  Each individual box or modular component can be removed, as long as locking clips are in place and replaced without disturbing the rest of the hive.  The comb frame is unique too and is a cross between a top bar hive and a regular frame, it needs no foundation! Eco Bee Box – Utah Hive with universal rabbets Utah Hive with […]

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Eco Bee Box and Utah Bee Removal in the News! – 2013

On Saturday, May 11, 2013, KSL news, FOX13 news, KUTV news, and ABC4 news reported a unique hive located in a master bedroom wall in Provo, Utah. Eco Bee Box teamed up with Utah Bee Removal in removing this colony relocating it to a local apiary.  The process of live bee removals is difficult but it has its benefits.  Both Utah Bee Removal and Eco Bee Box believe the wild local hives are the key to understanding the bee collapse across the nation.  A colony like the one described in news grew and out-performed the many other beekeeper maintained colonies. A […]

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Explain “Eco” in “Eco Bee Box”? – 2013

How is an Eco Bee Box “Eco”?  On “WiseGeek.org”  “Eco-friendly” is described as good for the environment, or “ecologically friendly,” and “environmentally friendly” or “green”.  Eco-friendly includes items constructed in an environmentally friendly way of making lifestyle changes designed to benefit the environment. One suggested finish on an Eco Bee Box is made of 100% natural water-proof ingredients.  This is used instead of paint to water-proof. Paint has fungicides.  Older boxes can have paints still laced with lead. This natural finish saves paint, labor, and is safer for the bee, and honey. The finger-joint style of building a beehive has lumber […]

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