P. F. Thurber Award for Inventiveness awarded to Eco Bee Box in Beekeeping

Thinking Out-of- the-Box in Beekeeping

Want to read an article in beekeeping that “pops the bubble” so to speak? Just think, the mini hives were not included in the list…probably a good thing! It seemed to be a prod not to disrupt-the-boat type of article. Thinking and invention are how new things come about and old ones are proven. The test isn’t always clear in beekeeping as many end goals can be desired, for example…for teaching instead of honey production, for queens, for smaller yards, for older or younger people, for beauty, just for FUN. Thank you, Peter Borst, for not mentioning us in this […]

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Eco Bee Box Hives & Methods – 2017

Beehive methods and evolution by Eco Bee Box Beekeeping by Eco Bee Box the producer of the Mini Urban Beehive Publication can be found on EBay, Amazon, or EcoBeeBox.com It has been over 9 years since Eco Bee Box began. Imagine that! During that time the corner hardware was developed, then locking clips, entrance reducers and finally the metal replacement rabbets. Pretty cool so far huh? During this same time, the Mini Urban Beehive (MUB) was developed to teach new beekeepers, and how to raise local queens. This mini hive showed promise for taking tiny colonies through winter, and since […]

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Spring Inspections for Beekeepers – 2016

When can you inspect in spring?  If the bees are flying, you can go into it. Temps over 50 are okay for peeking or pulling a frame. Full inspections should wait until it is above ’60s. The critical and immediate concern is overcrowding. Carnies will swarm faster than Italians. Clean off the bottom board if layered with dead bees.  Scrape off burr and bridge comb, and excessive Propolis.   Remove obstructions from all entrances. If your colony failed over the winter, try to assess why.  Too many beekeepers take colonies into winter with not enough bees to fill a box. […]

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Information About Varroa Destructor and Honey Bees – 2016

When a beekeeper dismisses Varroa mite inspections and control, the result will be kissing your bees goodbye.   A few facts on Varroa Destructor.   imported from Asia where Apis Cerana developed tactics to defend against them European honeybees have a difficulty fighting against these intrusive insects African(ized) honeybees have been successful defending their colonies from the Varroa. Varroa builds up tolerances against treatments, so varied treatments are a must. One product may be good this time, but ineffective next time. 2 treatments 8 days apart is needed, to kill or weaken the mites active in the hive, as well […]

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Chubak Method for Laying Workers – 2015

Some have asked about how we solve a laying working problem in a beehive. This can be a costly problem, and a fatal issue which can end your beekeeping season. Eco Bee Box Mini Urban Beehive. What happens: When a colony goes queen-less for a period of time, about 20 days, a number of worker bees (unfertilized females) begin to lay eggs. These eggs are raised and become drones. Drones do little to aid a colony and consume lots. Quickly the frames are changed to drone cells which look like popping eyes. Slowly the worker bees diminish and all you […]

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Solving Beekeeping Problems is Like Trying to Put Plugs in a Sponge to Stop Water – ABF Quarterly 2019

Originally published in the American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Quarterly Vol. 77 No. 2  pg. 28-29. 2019 A challenge in beekeeping many can relate to…which hole to stop first?  “If it isn’t one thing it is another” is the adage that some say with regard to how to keep honey bees alive.  Honey bees are “livestock” and as such, there is an unseen and visible world threatening them daily.  Each year lessons are sadly learned as a result of mistakes, both intentional and unintentional.  These lessons vary from apiary to apiary, hive to hive, and beekeeper to beekeeper.  One apiary may […]

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Duties of the Beekeeper – Etiquette in Learning and Reading a Frame – ABF Quarterly 2018

Originally published in the American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Quarterly Vol. 76 No. pg. 36-37. 2018 With any hobby, the goal of why a particular hobby was chosen over others can be quite diverse.  Enjoyment, filling a void, supporting another interest like gardening, can be for learning and demystifying a world previously unknown, there is a social attraction for those wanting friends or just want to meet others of similar mind, and yes it can be for producing the golden sweet honey.  Farmers-markets, classes, socials, conferences, workshops, hiving, inspections, harvest, give an almost constant series of activities to enjoy on a […]

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The Honor of Being a Mentor – 2019 ABF Quarterly

Originally published in the American Beekeeping Federation (ABF) Quarterly Vol. 77 No. 1 pg. 30-31. 2019 A teacher’s relationship with a student remains for a lifetime.  An English teacher in high school seeing a low-level reading desire in a student gifted him a non-typical book, “Reilly’s Luck” by Louis Lamour on the condition once the book was read it was to be returned.  This student hid the book and took it to his car and there it stayed.  Later that night the novel was rediscovered and the result, the novel was returned the next day to the insightful teacher.  To […]

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Evolution of the Bee Sanctuary Hive – 2019

Several years ago, in 2012, a new beekeeper and friend confessed to buying several hive styles because he wanted to see what the differences were and which was the best “for him”.  The insightful question was asked, “what did you find?” This is where the evolution began for the Sanctuary Long-box hive.  As he explained what his needs were, it was clear the standard Langstroth Deep System was not ideal for him in most respects.  One of the hives he tested was a top-bar hive with copper and a few “bells and whistles”.  Some of his findings were: Due to […]

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